Mongabay in the news, April 2019
May17

Mongabay in the news, April 2019

Some top impressions for Mongabay in the media last month were in the journal Science which reported on our feature about glow in the dark frogs. and Foreign Policy whose article about the presidential election in Indonesia referenced our 2-year investigation of corrupt land deals that underpin the expansion of palm oil in the country. Elsewhere, Public Radio International picked up on Brazil correspondent Sue Branford’s reporting about the new Brazilian President’s plan to open indigenous reserves to mining without their consent in a conversation that aired on many US radio stations including WBFO in Buffalo, NY, and WESA in Pittsburgh, PA. Our reporting also appears beyond the bounds of our main website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish our articles, such as the report about indigenous people responding to deforestation threats in Panama that later appeared at the Pulitzer Center’s website. Mongabay reports are regularly republished like this under our Creative Commons license, and we encourage other media outlets to use our features in their own publications (review our reuse policy and guidelines here). Here’s a selection of outlets that our reporting was republished, cited, or re-reported by during April 2019: Adaderana-Sri Lanka, Asia Times, Asia Sentinel, Asian Correspondent, Business Times, Ecowatch, Foreign Policy, Frontier Myanmar, Gizmodo, Inhabitat, The Island, National Geographic, Pacific Standard, Public Radio International, Pulitzer Center, Science, Smithsonian, WBFO-Buffalo, and WESA-Pittsburgh. Banner image: The critically endangered golden mantella is one of Madagascar’s most threatened amphibian species. Image by Rhett A....

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Mongabay in the News, March 2019
Apr26

Mongabay in the News, March 2019

The top impression for Mongabay in the media last month was Reuters reporting on our exposé about a Chinese bank-funded dam in endangered orangutan habitat allegedly relying on forged permits: their report was sent across the newswires and republished.  Chief Brazil correspondent Sue Branford was interviewed by the large National Public Radio (U.S.) environment show, Living on Earth, about the new Brazilian President’s plan to open indigenous reserves to mining without their consent, hear their conversation that aired across 250 radio stations here. Our reporting also appears beyond the bounds of our main website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish our articles, such as the report about forests absorbing more CO2 as emissions rise that appeared in the Asia Times. Mongabay reports are regularly republished like this under our Creative Commons license, and we encourage other media outlets to use our features in their own publications (review our reuse policy and guidelines here). Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting was republished, cited, or re-reported by during March 2019: Animal Politico, Asia Times, Asian Correspondent, Breaking Belize News, CNBC-TV, Carbon Brief, Chiapas Paralelo, China Dialogue, El Colombiano, El Comercio, Common Dreams, The Dodo, Earth.com, Eco-Business, Ecowatch, FM-Bolivia, FirstPost, Forbes, The Guardian, The Hans-India, Huffpost India, India Blooms, India Times, Indigenous News, Lado B, Living on Earth, Logical Indian, Metro-Nicaragua, Millennium Post, NSS Oaxaca, National Geographic, National Geographic Australia, Pacific Standard, Pagina Siete, Periodico Central, Psychology Today, Publimetro, Reuters, Scroll, La Semana, Smithsonian, Southeast Asia Globe, Speak up for Blue Podcast, Televisa News, Truthout, and The Wire. Banner image of a hyrax in Namibia by Rhett A....

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Mongabay in the News, February 2019
Mar22

Mongabay in the News, February 2019

The biggest impression for Mongabay in the media last month came from news that our Latin America bureau Mongabay-Latam and its partner at the major Bolivian daily newspaper El Deber had won the El Rey Award, also known as the King of Spain International Journalism Award, for Roberto Navia Gabriel’s investigative report on illegal trafficking in jaguar fangs, which was produced and published by both media outlets (ore about the winning project here). The El Rey is the top prize recognizing Spanish and Portuguese-language journalism in Ibero-America. Our reporting also appears beyond the bounds of our main website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Animal Politico picked up our story about a monarch butterfly reserve near Mexico City during February, and Cambodia Daily republished our feature about the Prey Lang Forest, for instance. Mongabay reports are regularly republished like this under our Creative Commons license, and we encourage other media outlets to republish our features in their own publications (learn how to do this here). Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during February 2019: Asian Correspondent, Business Insider, CNBC TV18, Cambodia Daily, El Comercio, El Deber, EJU-TV, Eco-Business, EcoWatch, El Espectador, FirstPost, IPP Media, India Times, International News Lens, Lado B, La Mula, The Logical Indian, The News Minute, Online Khabar, Pacific Standard, La Prensa, Publico, Publimetro, Science, Scroll, La Semana, Weekend Leader, The Wire. Banner image of a spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura similis) in Panama by Rhett A. Butler for...

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Mongabay in the news, January 2019
Feb25

Mongabay in the news, January 2019

The biggest impression for Mongabay in the news this January came from the paper our team published in the journal Science about the ways bioacoustics can help monitor forests. This finding was picked up by writers at New Straits Times plus at Quartz and Mashable and international wire service UPI among others. Our reporting appears like this in places beyond the bounds of our main website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Other instances in January included a mention of our reporting by the Washington Post in reference to the record sale of a bluefin tuna in Japan, which was picked up widely. Mongabay reports are also regularly republished in their entirety under its Creative Commons license, and encourages media outlets to republish our features in their own publications [learn how to do this here]. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during January 2019: Asia Times, The Assam Tribune, Common Dreams, Eco-Business, Forbes, Malaysiakini, Mashable, The News Minute, Pacific Standard, La Prensa, Quartz, Resumen Latinoamericano, Reuters, Scroll, Smithsonian, The Star, Stars and Stripes, Straits Times, United Press International, Washington Post, WBFO-Buffalo, and Yahoo News. Banner image: Pacific bluefin tuna by Rhett A....

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Mongabay in the news, December 2018
Jan28

Mongabay in the news, December 2018

Our reporting appears in places beyond the bounds of our main website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Highlights from this past month center on radio broadcasts: after our writer Jeremy Hance was interviewed by National Public Radio’s environmental news program Living on Earth late in November, the interview was broadcast on hundreds of stations around North America. Public Radio International picked up on that and in December shared an article about it with all their affiliate stations around the U.S. Elsewhere our Justin Catanoso was interviewed by North Carolina Public Radio about his coverage from the latest round of climate treaty negotiations in Poland for Mongabay, which was heard on its state-wide news talk program, “The State of Things.” Numerous Mongabay reports were also republished in their entirety in December, including an article about tracing the safeguards against illegal logging in Vietnam by our Chris Humphrey, which later appeared at Asia Times. Mongabay publishes on a Creative Commons basis and encourages media outlets to republish our features in their own publications [learn how to do this here]. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during December 2018: Asia Times, Asian Correspondent, Business Standard, Can-India News, El Ciudad Ano, El Comercio, Common Dreams, DX, Daiji World, Dhaka Tribune, EJU TV, Earth News, Eco-Business, EcoWatch, First Post, Grist, Huffington Post, IJNet, India Blooms, India West News, Indigenous News, The Inquirer, Morung Express, Mother Jones, La Mula, El Mundo, Nagaland Post, New Kerala News, The News Advance, The News Lens, News-Armenia, News D, North Carolina Public Radio, Outlook India, Public Radio International, Pacific Standard, El Pais, El Popular, Pulitzer Center, Quartz, The Quint, RIA Novosti, Riau Online, SciDev, Scroll, La Semana, The Sentinel, Shillong Times, Sierra Magazine, The Statesman, Telegana Today, Than Nien, WESA Radio Pittsburgh, and Yahoo News Taiwan. Banner image of a lava lizard in Ecuador by Rhett A. Butler for...

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Bioacoustics paper published in Science
Jan05

Bioacoustics paper published in Science

In 2017, Mongabay’s Conservation Effectiveness series looked at what the scientific literature tells us is working and not working in the field of conservation. The series produced award-winning reporting which generated wide-ranging discussions across conservation. One of the key conclusions from the project was that conservation studies generally haven’t been designed to rigorously assess effectiveness of projects, interventions, or strategies. After the series wrapped up, we kept thinking about this issue and whether there may be other ways to measure conservation outcomes. Zuzana Burivalova, the Princeton scientist we hired to oversee the academic research component of Conservation Effectiveness, uses bioacoustics in her field work. This prompted conversations about applying bioacoustics to evaluating conservation effectiveness and eventually spurred Burivalova, Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett Butler, and Eddie Game from the Nature Conservancy to write a paper, which was published yesterday in Science: The sound of a tropical forest. “An increasing number of ecologists and conservation scientists are using bioacoustics in their research,” said Butler. “We argue that bioacoustics could be used to strengthen zero deforestation commitments, monitor biodiversity at scale, and provide a mechanism for evaluating the effectiveness of conservation projects and interventions. Our hope is that the paper raises visibility for everyone working on bioacoustics.” The paper calls out two opportunities: using bioacoustics to strengthen corporate zero deforestation commitments that are being adopted by companies in the palm oil, timber, and cacao sectors, among others; and creating a world-class central repository for bioacoustic data that can be used by researchers. “The dream is a scenario where zero deforestation companies are funding real-time monitoring of forests, with data fed into the cloud for use by scientists, giving us a better picture of what’s working and what’s not working in conservation and landscape restoration,” said Butler. “Combined with satellite data and networked camera traps, we’d have a much clearer picture for measuring trends in wildlife populations.” To date, the paper has attracted significant media attention, with more the 30 media outlets covering the study within 24 hours of publication. Butler also penned an op-ed for Singapore’s Straits Times about how bioacoustics could support zero deforestation commitments. And Mongabay covered the paper as...

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