SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES


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The Special Reporting Initiatives (SRI) program enables professional journalists to do series of in-depth articles—published under an open Creative Commons license that allows for re-publishing elsewhere—on particular environmental issues. Each SRI provides the support for high-quality, detailed, and potentially investigative reporting on a subject that may be otherwise overlooked by the media. Learn more about our SRI program.

The value of the Special Reporting Initiatives program is that it enables high-quality and detailed reporting on an environmental issue that may be otherwise overlooked or underreported by the broader media. In contrast to an aggregation of case studies in a single report, a series of in-depth articles highlights each case study or story separately, boosting its prominence. SRI fellows are given the funding and support to become issue area experts, adding value to their own career and contributing to the wider conversation regarding the state of our natural world.

SRI REPORTING & ANNOUNCEMENTS

Kneeling in a small clearing amid tropical trees, Baldemar Mazaro skillfully arranges a circle of sticks and a noose of cord in the community of San Miguel de Bala. He hands a branch to a tourist and asks her to prod the sticks as if the branch were the nose of an animal snuffling around, looking for food. [...]
Wed, Feb 25, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
Kneeling in a small clearing amid tropical trees, Baldemar Mazaro skillfully arranges a circle of sticks and a noose of cord in the community of San Miguel de Bala. He hands a branch to a tourist and asks her to prod the sticks as if the branch were the nose of an animal snuffling around, looking for food. [...]
Wed, Feb 25, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
The Munduruku indigenous tribe have begun to mark out the limits of their land, in an action that could halt the giant São Luiz do Tapajós hydroelectric dam, the apple of the Brazilian government's eye. Although sacred, this land will be flooded if the dam goes ahead. 'We are not leaving,' says the village chief. [...]
Fri, Feb 20, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
The Brazilian government opposes granting traditional land to the Munduruku people since it would jeopardize seven proposed hydroelectric dams on the Tapajós River. For this reason, a year-old report by Funai that supports the Munduruku claim has not been officially published, but a copy of this report was obtained by the Brazilian publication Publica. [...]
Thu, Feb 19, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
In Peru's vast northeastern region, where roads are scarce and forests abundant, crackdowns on the illegal plundering of timber, fish, and wildlife are sporadic and expensive. To fill the gap, the Peruvian National Park Service and non-profit conservation organizations encourage community groups to patrol their lakes and forests and control fishing and hunting. [...]
Fri, Feb 13, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
Scientist and entrepreneur turn to Brazil nuts to protect Peru's threatened forests. Sofía Rubio was eight years old when she decided she wanted to be a biologist. 'I would skip school to go to the woods with my father or mother,' who did research in what is now the Tambopata National Reserve in the southeastern Peruvian Amazon, she says. [...]
Wed, Feb 11, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES