SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES


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The Special Reporting Initiatives (SRI) program enables professional journalists to do series of in-depth articles—published under an open Creative Commons license that allows for re-publishing elsewhere—on particular environmental issues. Each SRI provides the support for high-quality, detailed, and potentially investigative reporting on a subject that may be otherwise overlooked by the media. Learn more about our SRI program.

The value of the Special Reporting Initiatives program is that it enables high-quality and detailed reporting on an environmental issue that may be otherwise overlooked or underreported by the broader media. In contrast to an aggregation of case studies in a single report, a series of in-depth articles highlights each case study or story separately, boosting its prominence. SRI fellows are given the funding and support to become issue area experts, adding value to their own career and contributing to the wider conversation regarding the state of our natural world.

SRI REPORTING & ANNOUNCEMENTS

For much of Bolivian history, environmental and human rights NGOs joined indigenous communities and the poor in an uphill battle against the entrenched old guard. Under the country's first indigenous president, these organizations face unexpected challenges. [...]
Fri, May 22, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
For produce raised on some of Senegal's most fertile cropland, the shortest route to the richest urban markets runs through another country. This geographic reality, with its multiple logistical hurdles, illustrates the food security challenges facing Senegal and the wider West African region. The trouble with feeding people here is not so much the availability of food but its accessibility. The difficulties arise not just in agricultural production but also in inefficient food delivery systems [...]
Tue, May 19, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
Peru is proposing a huge hydroelectric dam in the Amazon that, if built, will be one of the most powerful on Earth, do significant harm to the environment, and flood the homes of thousands of people. The proposed mega-dam would be constructed at the Pongo de Manseriche, a spectacular gorge on the free flowing Marañón River, the main source of the Amazon River. [...]
Mon, May 18, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
'I don't want to sell my land because I've lived here since I was 17,' declared 82 year old María Araujo Silva. 'This was where my children were born. I want to die here. That's why I'm not in agreement. I'm not in agreement with the dam.' Araujo Silva is outraged at plans by Peru's government and Brazilian company Odebrecht to build a hydroelectric dam just downriver from her village, Huarac, on the Marañón River. [...]
Mon, May 11, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
Peru is planning a series of huge hydroelectric dams on the 1,700-kilometer (1,056-mile) Marañón River, which begins in the Peruvian Andes and is the main source of the Amazon River. Critics say the mega-dam projects could destroy the currently free-flowing Marañón, resulting in what Peruvian engineer Jose Serra Vega calls its 'biological death'. [...]
Tue, Apr 28, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES
'When they came, what could we do?' 46-year-old fisherman Nguyên Phú asks, crouching down like a frog with his hands above his head. 'We just put our hands up like this, and said, 'Don't shoot! Don't shoot!'' Their caution is warranted. If they venture too deeply into Vietnam's claimed territorial waters, a Chinese patrol boat will swoop down on them. [...]
Fri, Apr 17, 2015
Source: SPECIAL REPORTING INITIATIVES