Mongabay Latam story generates multiple impacts in Peru
Oct23

Mongabay Latam story generates multiple impacts in Peru

For the residents of remote rural areas like the Peruvian Amazon, Mongabay provides a vital service by covering issues that the mainstream media have neither the editorial budgets nor perhaps the political space to report on. However, local and international NGOs, a core constituency of civil society, increasingly use our reports to share information with their communities and advocate for policy changes from governmental officials. One example from Peru is particularly illustrative of Mongabay’s role in enabling consensus building. In September 2017, six farmers were murdered in the district of Nueva Requena. Their bodies were found floating in a river; they had been shot in the head, and their hands and feet bound. The initial reports of this incident that reached the capital in Lima were inaccurate, yet no journalists traveled to the area to follow up in the immediate aftermath. However, one of Mongabay’s reporters went there five days after the crime to produce the story “Ucayali Forests: a booty for land traffickers” (English version here). The report detailed serious problems associated with land trafficking, the development of new roads into forests, and the complicity of local authorities in the nontransparent “legalization” of these schemes. The information published in that story was then included in an investigation by Peru’s Public Prosecutor’s Office into illegal land grabs in Ucayali by palm oil companies. A prosecutor specializing in environmental crimes later said, “Media like Mongabay-Latam contributes knowledge of the true situation of the environment. With the information they provide, which is evaluated and verified, officials can make decisions.” As a result of Mongabay’s extensive reporting, the National Organization of Andean and Amazonian Indigenous Women of Peru (ONAMIAP) republished the Mongabay-Latam story on its website to share the news directly with its community. Then in March 2018, National Geographic published a report on infrastructure development in Ucayali and cited Mongabay’s reporting in the region. Finally, the Environmental Investigation Agency requested GPS coordinates for the disputed area to monitor the progress of deforestation in this area which had not previously been mapped. The same request was made by the Andean Amazon Monitoring Project to establish, through satellite maps, the increasing forest loss in the area. Keep up with all of Mongabay-Latam’s coverage at the website, https://es.mongabay.com or on social media (Facebook: @MongabayLatam, Twitter: @MongabayLatam, Instagram: @MongabayLatam).  Banner photo depicting the area in question by Mongabay-Latam reporter Yvette Sierra...

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Mongabay in the news, September 2018
Oct17

Mongabay in the news, September 2018

Mongabay’s reporting appears in many places beyond the bounds of the website when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Highlights from this past month include our story “Slave labor found at Starbucks-certified Brazil coffee plantation,” which was published in concert with Reporter-Brasil, getting picked up by Reddit (“The front page of the internet”), leading to a massive spike in traffic to our site. Fast Company picked up Mongabay Wildtech’s story about 3-D printing of reefs and Mongabay founder Rhett Butler was interviewed by Norwegian newspaper Dagbladet. And one of Mongabay’s editors published an op-ed at the Washington Post about what’s been learned through publishing an ongoing series on agroforestry. Plenty of our reports were also republished in their entirety, including one about a new audio technique to detect poaching, which was featured by the award-winning magazine Pacific Standard. Mongabay publishes on a Creative Commons basis and encourages media outlets to republish its features in their own publications. Learn how to do this here. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during September 2018: All Africa.com, Asia Sentinel, Asia Times, Asian Correspondent, Bahamas Tribune, Bloomberg, Business Insider, Business Standard, CAN India, CityToday, El Colombiano, El Comercio, Dagbladet, Daiji World, El Deber, Devdiscourse, EFE Brasil, EJU, Eco-Business, The Ecologist, Ecowatch, Economic Times, El Espectador, Fast Company, Finanzas, Gulf Today, The Hoopoe, Inhabitat, Inquisitr, International News Lens, Lado B, Millennium Post, Mizzima News, La Mula, MSN Finance, MoneyLife, New Kerala, News Minute, Newsheads, Outlook India, Pacific Standard, El Popular, Post Online, Publimetro, Radio Santa Fe, Reader Supported News, Reddit, RPP Noticias, SIFY News, Science Magazine, Scroll, La Semana, Speak up for Blue podcast, Sunday Guardian, Technews, Telecinco, TimesNowNews, Tribune India, Truthout, Unearthed, United Nations newswire, Unwire, Washington Post, Weekend Leader, La Vanguardia, Yahoo Finance Espanol and Yahoo News-Brazil. Banner photo: Tree frog in tropical forest of Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. Image by Rhett Butler for...

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Two Spring 2019 Internship Opportunities
Oct09

Two Spring 2019 Internship Opportunities

Mongabay.org offers two exciting internship opportunities. The first opportunity primarily involves writing environmental news stories for our affiliated news site – Mongabay.com. Our interns will have the opportunity to develop their writing skills and have their news stories be published on our renowned website. The second opportunity, which started in the summer of 2018, is similar but it focuses on technology that plays a crucial role in improving our understanding and protection of nature on our Mongabay Wildtech news site. Wildtech interns will apply their research, critical thinking and writing skills to produce stories about the development and innovative use of technology to improve research and conservation outcomes. Full internship details here Deadline to apply is November...

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Mongabay publishes op-ed in the Washington Post
Sep25

Mongabay publishes op-ed in the Washington Post

Mongabay editor Erik Hoffner recently wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post on the topic of agroforestry, which is the focus of a series he’s editing for the site. In it he argues that this agricultural technique — which involves the growing of useful trees and woody shrubs like coffee or cacao in combination with medicinal herbs, vegetables and fruits in a system mimicking a forest — is a good investment in carbon sequestration, and one that’s good for farmers and biodiversity, too: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/theworldpost/wp/2018/09/11/agroforestry/ View the articles in Mongabay’s ongoing “Global Agroforestry” series here. The series has traveled to Honduras, Kenya, Sri Lanka, and many other regions so far, and upcoming features will focus on the Central Asian countries of Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Banner image: Maureen Salim shows off a pumpkin grown amongst her trees. Photo by Sophie Mbugua for...

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Mongabay in the news, August 2018
Sep20

Mongabay in the news, August 2018

Mongabay’s reporting appears in many places beyond the bounds of the website when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Highlights from this past month included the Associated Press putting out a news wire story based on a Mongabay report about the Forest Stewardship Council postponing the pending membership of Indonesia’s giant paper company Asia Pulp & Paper, which was republished by outlets around the world ranging from the San Francisco Chronicle to US News and World Report to the Washington Post and Fox Business News. Agence France Presse also put out wire stories using Mongabay content, one related to saving trees in Niger and the other about the use of drones to monitor Peru’s Amazon Forest, which appeared in publications ranging from Yahoo News to News 24 in Capetown. Plenty of our reports were also republished in their entirety, including one about development pressure in Penang Island, Malaysia, which was featured at the International News Lens. Mongabay publishes on a Creative Commons basis and encourages media outlets to republish its features in their own publications. Learn how to do this here. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during August 2018: ASEAN Post, Agence France Presse, Asia Times, Associated Press, Asian Correspondent, Business Standard, CNBC TV18, CanIndia, CemNet, The Chronicle, Clarín, Climate Home News, Common Dreams, The Conversation, Daiji World, DevDiscourse, Debate, Des Informenos, Deutsche Welle, Earth Island Journal, Eco-Business, Economic Times, El Comercio, Epoch Times, El Espectador, Financial Times, Fox Business, Gulf News, The Hans, Hindustan Times, IC, India.com, India Blooms, Inhabitat, Interfax, International News Lens, KSTP News, KTAR News, Lado B, Malay Mail, Manufacturing.net, MillenniumPost, MinnPost, Modern Ghana, MoneyLife, National Post, New Kerala.com, New Security Beat, New Vision, News 24 – Cape Town, Onda Local, Online Khabar, Outlook India, Pacific Standard, The Province, Publimetro, Pulitzer Center, Pulzo, The Quint, RPP Noticias, Radio Free Asia, SIFY, SciDev.net, Scroll, Seattle Times, La Semana, Sentinel Assam, Smithsonian Magazine, Speak up for Blue, Telesur TV, The Third Pole, Triple Pundit, Truthout, US News & World Report, El Universal, VOA-Indonesia, WORD 106.3, WPHT 1210, WTOP News, The Weekend Leader, The Wire, Yahoo News, and Zócalo Banner image: Scale-crested pygmy tyrant by Rhett...

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Mongabay Founder interviewed by ‘No Ordinary Business’
Sep12

Mongabay Founder interviewed by ‘No Ordinary Business’

Mongabay’s Founder & CEO Rhett A. Butler is the focus of a new feature at “No Ordinary Business,” a forum associated with Dana Philanthropy. Host Gina Pereira introduces the conversation this way: “In today’s highly politicised climate, it is a struggle to find media coverage that is purely fact-based. Even across the conservation world, much of environmental news is published by advocacy groups and is therefore focused on particular agendas. On the other hand, there is Mongabay, a fact-based non-advocacy online news service dedicated to informing the readership of social and environmental issues related to forests and other ecosystems.”  Gina and Rhett discuss the origins of Mongabay, the challenges and opportunities of running a media outlet like it, how Mongabay is navigating the massive changes in the media landscape, and future initiatives. Read the interview here. Banner image: Rhett...

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