New Special Reporting Project: Changing Africa
Apr23

New Special Reporting Project: Changing Africa

The African continent is undergoing accelerating changes. Urban and rural populations alike are growing rapidly, paced by rising demand for things like food and fuel, electricity and construction materials. The continent has also been a site for the extraction of resources propping up the wealthy North for centuries – palm oil, rubber, slaves; timber, crude oil, coltan – with often devastating impacts on the environment. Looming over all of this are the growing impacts of global warming on harvests, habitat, rivers, coastlines. There are complex choices ahead for people and policymakers in Africa and beyond. The Changing Africa project will look at these in the context of the natural world that everything rests upon, strengthening accurate and useful understandings of wildlife and ecosystems, considering both fruitful and harmful connections between conservation and development, and contributing to better protection of the natural world. For a full detail description and how to submit your pitch, please click...

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New Opportunity: Video Manager
Apr16

New Opportunity: Video Manager

Online video news provides a powerful and popular way of covering compelling stories and reach new audiences. To scale up and systematize Mongabay’s video program, we’re hiring a Video Manager to create, commission, and edit original content sourced from a global network of videographers inspired by conservation and environmental science. For a full detailed job description and how to apply, please click...

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Summer Internship at Mongabay – Now Accepting Applications
Apr05

Summer Internship at Mongabay – Now Accepting Applications

Mongabay is now accepting summer internship applications! Be sure to view our two available opportunities both playing a crucial role in writing environmental and conservation news stories. This opportunity will provide you with the necessary tools and resources to help develop your writing skills and have your news stories be published on our renowned website. View the full internship details here and how to apply. Application Deadline May...

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[VIDEO] ‘Dawning Anew’ environmental journalism discussion at CU Boulder
Apr04

[VIDEO] ‘Dawning Anew’ environmental journalism discussion at CU Boulder

In March, Mongabay staff were invited to visit the University of Colorado-Boulder to discuss our model for non-profit environmental journalism with their journalism students and environmental reporting fellows. As part of that trip an evening public discussion was planned – “Global Environmental Journalism: Under Siege or Dawning Anew?”– featuring Mongabay’s founder Rhett A. Butler and two contributing writers with CU ties, Chris Lett and Taran Volckhausen. Hosted by the Center for Environmental Journalism and partners at the Albert A. Bartlett Science Communication Center and College of Media, Communication and Information, the discussion was wide-ranging, from finding funding to reporting on solutions to environmental challenges vs. the constant stream of ‘hard news’ type stories. Mongabay.com was described as “one of the most successful environmental journalism startups in the world” in the event’s promotional materials, and the program was described further by the hosts this way, “CU Boulder’s Center for Environmental Journalism brought together Rhett Butler, the founder and CEO of Mongabay; Chris Lett, an Emmy-nominated journalist and Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism; and Taran Volckhausen, a Mongabay contributor and freelance multimedia journalist for an in-depth discussion about global environmental journalism. Watch here: “Butler shared Mongabay’s growth story — from his apartment to a global, multi-million-dollar environmental publication,” the event description continued. “He talked about what stories Mongabay is currently looking for, what the publication will want more of in the future, and what needs more coverage now — helpful for any journalist interested in working with Mongabay! All three talked about some of the biggest issues facing environmental journalism today. Michael Kodas, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and deputy director of the Center for Environmental Journalism, moderated the panel.” Many thanks to the Center for Environmental Journalism , Ted Scripps Fellowships in Environmental Journalism program and their partners at CU for hosting Mongabay. Banner image of dawn in Madagascar by Rhett A....

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Mongabay feature selected for ‘best science and nature writing’ anthology
Apr02

Mongabay feature selected for ‘best science and nature writing’ anthology

Mongabay is pleased to announce that senior correspondent Jeremy Hance’s feature, The great rhino U-turn, has been selected for inclusion in a highly regarded annual anthology that celebrates the best writing from the genre. This marks the first time that a Mongabay feature has been selected. “The news that my article on Sumatran rhinos was going to be included in ‘The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2019′ came totally out of the blue, it’s a huge honor and I’m over the moon about it! I think it’s especially exciting since wildlife conservation writing sometimes takes a back seat to other environmental and hard science stories when it comes to recognition in the field.” Mongabay Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler said, “It is a tremendous honor for Mongabay that Jeremy’s story was selected as one of the best science and nature pieces. We’re very proud of him and grateful for his reporting for Mongabay. We’re also very pleased that the piece focused on the Sumatran rhino, which is on the verge of extinction in the wild.” The selected feature is part three of a four-part series on Sumatran rhino conservation, and details how researchers at the Cincinnati Zoo finally unlocked the mysteries of the species’ reproduction. This is key because there are very few of the animals left in the world, and captive breeding and reintroduction is one of the most viable strategies for saving the species. But it took 17 years of work to make captive breeding work, so Jeremy’s fascinating chronicle of this herculean effort serves as a valuable and inspiring example of dedication and good science in service to conservation. “My hope is that inclusion in this anthology will bring greater attention to the plight of Sumatran rhinos, a species that desperately needs the Indonesian government and conservationists to act, and act quickly if we’re not to lose the singing rhino,” Jeremy continued, referring to the creature’s charming habit of vocalizing musically, sounds which he likens to whale songs. “Also, a hat tip to Isabel Esterman, the stellar editor of this piece, without whom neither of my series on Sumatran rhinos would have ever happened.” The book will also feature essays that appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, New York Times Magazine, and others, and will be in bookstores this October. One can pre-order a copy here. Read Jeremy’s story here and follow the links from there to parts one, two, and four. Mongabay’s entire series on Asian rhinos can be found here. Banner image: A Sumatran rhino calf, born in captivity at the Cincinnati Zoo, displays the species’ characteristic shaggy fur. Transferring rhinos to zoos in the West was...

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Mongabay in the News, February 2019
Mar22

Mongabay in the News, February 2019

The biggest impression for Mongabay in the media last month came from news that our Latin America bureau Mongabay-Latam and its partner at the major Bolivian daily newspaper El Deber had won the El Rey Award, also known as the King of Spain International Journalism Award, for Roberto Navia Gabriel’s investigative report on illegal trafficking in jaguar fangs, which was produced and published by both media outlets (ore about the winning project here). The El Rey is the top prize recognizing Spanish and Portuguese-language journalism in Ibero-America. Our reporting also appears beyond the bounds of our main website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Animal Politico picked up our story about a monarch butterfly reserve near Mexico City during February, and Cambodia Daily republished our feature about the Prey Lang Forest, for instance. Mongabay reports are regularly republished like this under our Creative Commons license, and we encourage other media outlets to republish our features in their own publications (learn how to do this here). Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during February 2019: Asian Correspondent, Business Insider, CNBC TV18, Cambodia Daily, El Comercio, El Deber, EJU-TV, Eco-Business, EcoWatch, El Espectador, FirstPost, IPP Media, India Times, International News Lens, Lado B, La Mula, The Logical Indian, The News Minute, Online Khabar, Pacific Standard, La Prensa, Publico, Publimetro, Science, Scroll, La Semana, Weekend Leader, The Wire. Banner image of a spiny-tailed iguana (Ctenosaura similis) in Panama by Rhett A. Butler for...

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