Mongabay in the news, September 2019
Nov04

Mongabay in the news, September 2019

Our reporting often appears beyond the bounds of the main website and multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish or otherwise use our work. Our team is sometimes interviewed about their work, too, as when our Karla Mendes appeared on syndicated radio program Sea Change Radio to discuss her reporting on the Amazon fires. Founder/CEO Rhett Butler also penned an op-ed for Singapore’s major daily The Straits Times about Indonesia’s own forest crisis. Many of Mongabay’s appearances elsewhere in the media happen when other outlets republish reports via our Creative Commons license, as when major Spanish daily El Pais reprinted our Portuguese coverage of the correlation between deforestation and fires there. We encourage other media outlets to republish our features like this in their own publications, review our republishing policy and guidelines here. Here’s a selection of instances where our reporting was republished, cited, or re-reported by various media outlets during September 2019: AllAfrica.com, Atlas Obscura, Business Insider, CNBC-TV, The Cap Times, El Comercio, The Concordian, Courrier International, Diálogo, EOS News, Earth.com, Earth Island Journal, Eco-business, Ecowatch, Eurasia Review, Huffington Post, International News Lens, MSN, Mic.com, Middlebury Institute, Nepali Times, The New Leam, News 18, El Pais, Pursuit, Quartz, Quartz-India, Rakyat Post, Science, Scroll, Sea Change Radio, Straits Times, The Times of Israel, Willamette Collegian, The Wire, and Zimbabwe Broadcasting Corporation. Banner image: warthog in Kenya by Rhett A. Butler for...

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Using Global Forest Watch: Free webinar for journalists, November 13
Oct23

Using Global Forest Watch: Free webinar for journalists, November 13

  The availability of near-real-time deforestation data via Global Forest Watch (GFW) is expanding, creating a growing number of opportunities for journalists to leverage this material in their reporting on forest issues. To help writers capitalize on this opportunity, Mongabay is organizing an online training on November 13 at 10:00 AM Eastern Time in collaboration with GFW staff to demonstrate how journalists can use its tools to add evidence to news articles, and to explain how GFW’s Places to Watch methodology is being utilized to identify areas of recent deforestation for on-the-ground investigation and reporting, such as Mongabay’s Forest Trackers article series. While many of the tools that journalists use to tell stories offer tutorials, most of these are general and don’t provide the context that’s most relevant to how journalists can use them. The webinar will provide practical information about how journalists can use GFW tools and participants will gain a better understanding for how to access and interpret the information, as well as how to appropriately use this information in their reporting. Participating trainers: Willie Shubert, Global Program Director – Mongabay Mikaela Weisse, Manager – Global Forest Watch Kai Kresek, Junior Data Specialist – Global Forest Watch View more information and register for this free training here. Banner image: Map produced using GFW tools for a feature from Cameroon in Mongabay’s Forest Trackers series, where a rubber plantation was found to have expanded into 127 square kilometers of primary...

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Mongabay feature published in ‘best science and nature writing’ anthology
Oct07

Mongabay feature published in ‘best science and nature writing’ anthology

Mongabay is pleased to announce that senior correspondent Jeremy Hance’s feature, The great rhino U-turn, has been published in ‘The Best American Science and Nature Writing 2019,” a highly regarded annual anthology that celebrates the best writing from the genre. This marks the first time that a Mongabay feature has been selected. When he heard the news earlier this year, Hance exclaimed, “The news that my article on Sumatran rhinos was going to be included [came] totally out of the blue, it’s a huge honor and I’m over the moon about it!” He added that, “I think it’s especially exciting since wildlife conservation writing sometimes takes a back seat to other environmental and hard science stories when it comes to recognition in the field.” The selected feature is part three of a four-part series on Sumatran rhino conservation, and details how researchers at the Cincinnati Zoo finally unlocked the mysteries of the species’ reproduction. This is key because there are very few of the animals left in the world, and captive breeding and reintroduction is one of the most viable strategies for saving the species. But it took 17 years of work to make captive breeding work, so Jeremy’s fascinating chronicle of this herculean effort serves as a valuable and inspiring example of dedication and good science in service to conservation. “My hope is that inclusion in this anthology will bring greater attention to the plight of Sumatran rhinos, a species that desperately needs the Indonesian government and conservationists to act, and act quickly if we’re not to lose the singing rhino,” he continued, referring to the creature’s charming habit of vocalizing musically, sounds which he likens to whale songs. The timing of all this is important, since a recent effort to breed one of the last remaining Sumatran rhinos looks unlikely to succeed again due to ‘bureaucratic quibbling’ on Indonesia’s part, as Mongabay’s Basten Gokkon recently reported. The book also features essays that first appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, Pacific Standard, New York Times Magazine, and others, and is now in bookstores around the U.S. Order a copy from an independent bookstore near you here. Read Jeremy’s story here and follow the links from there to parts one, two, and four. Mongabay’s entire series on Asian rhinos can be found here. Banner image: a calf born in 2016 in Indonesia’s Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary. Photo by Rhett A. Butler for...

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Mongabay in the news, August 2019
Sep30

Mongabay in the news, August 2019

Mongabay reports often appear beyond the bounds of the main website and multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish or otherwise use our work. In the past month many outlets relied on our work especially in covering the Amazon fires, including the New York Times, Newsweek, and Quartz. Due to Mongabay’s long track record covering these Amazon forest trends, our CEO Rhett Butler was interviewed by numerous radio and TV programs, ranging from BBC Radio to CBC television, KPFK-Los Angeles, and France-24. Mongabay’s reports are regularly republished too, via our Creative Commons license, for instance, Grist republished our report showing the latest imagery of the fires in Brazil, and our article about land protests in Cambodia was picked up by the Asia Times. We encourage other media outlets to republish our features like this in their own publications, please review our republishing policy and guidelines here. Here’s a selection of instances where our reporting was republished, cited, or re-reported by peer media outlets during August 2019: Acento, Actual, Adaderana News, Asia Times, Atlas Obscura, BBC, BBC-Mundo, The Better India, Bogota Post, Business Insider, Bustle, CBC, CNBC-TV18, Cambodia Daily, Central News Agency, CityLab/The Atlantic, CleanTechnica, El Comercio, Common Dreams, DOGO News, Daily Caller, El Deber, El Desconcierto, ESI Africa, Earth.com, Earth Island Journal, Eco-Business, Ecowatch, Epoch Times, El Espectador, Espressen, Eurasia Review, First Post, Food Tank, Forbes, Free Speech TV, Gizmodo, Gizmodo-Australia, Gizmodo UK, Grist, The Hill, Huffington Post-India, IDN Times, IFL Science, INews.co.uk, Inhabitat, Inside Edition, The International News Lens, Jurnas, KBIA 91.3 FM, KPFK-LA, Lado B, El Liberator, Live Science, Mashable, Mother Nature Network, La Mula, La Nacion, National Observer, Nature, The New Leam, The New Republic, New Security Beat, The New York Times, News Global, Newshub, Newsweek, North Kentucky Tribune, El Nuevo Dia, O Eco, One World, Pacific Standard, El Pais, Political Insider, Popular Science, Pulitzer Center, Quartz, Quartz-India, The Quint, RPP Noticias, Rakyat Post, Riau One, Scroll, La Semana, Seminario Universidad, SinaNews.tw, Smithsonian, South Whidbey Record, TAZ, TRT World News, TVBS, Der Tagesspiegel, Timis, Treehugger, Union-Bulletin, El Universo, Vice, WP Tech, WSLS-TV, Washington Post, The Wire, Yahoo Finance News, Yahoo News, Yahoo News-ES, and Yale Environment...

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Mongabay’s David Martin to judge the Jackson Wild film awards
Sep10

Mongabay’s David Martin to judge the Jackson Wild film awards

Mongabay is pleased to announce that its Director of Partnerships, David Martin, is a member of the final jury for the 2019 Jackson Wild Media Awards. This festival which bestows awards on the best nature and science-inspired filmmaking happens this year between September 21 and 27 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. David played a key role in the launch of Mongabay’s diverse video content which is posted to social media channels and aims to raise awareness about unfolding events around the planet, while inspiring audiences to love nature and get involved with conservation. He deeply believes that media plays a powerful role in shaping the world as we know it, and works to elevate solutions-oriented content that moves the needle in terms of creating a livable and equitable planet for all. Of today’s overall environmental media landscape, he said, “It’s really inspiring to see what’s being done to capture the minds and hearts of people and get them focused on wildlife and our planet. We are at a critical juncture.” As a judge, he must watch each of the finalist films in each category, an impressive list totaling some 45 hours of viewing. The finalists in 30 categories were whittled down from over 1,000 entries and range from   BBC’s “Blue Planet II: One Ocean” in the Animal Behavior-Long Form category to “Sea of Shadows” about the world’s most endangered porpoise, the vaquita, in the Best Conservation Film-Long Form category, to National Geographic’s “Last Wild Places: Gorongosa” film about Mozambique’s famous Gorongosa National Park in the Best People & Nature Film-Short Form category. “I’m doing my best to apply a ‘critical eye’ when I watch these films, but honestly at this end point in the process, every one of these films deserves high praise and accolades,” he said. “There’s an incredible amount of quality here.” Read more about Jackson Wild (which has a conservation focus of “Living Oceans” this year) and Media Awards here, and learn about David’s fellow members of the jury here. If you plan to attend this event, please seek David out and say hello.  ...

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