Mongabay in the news, November 2018
Dec18

Mongabay in the news, November 2018

Our reporting appears in places far beyond the bounds of our main website and additional language subdomains when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Highlights from this past month include Phys Org, the big science, research and technology news aggregator, picking up Mongabay’s news of publishing of a peer-reviewed study demonstrating that public interest in the environment–from biodiversity to climate change–is increasing. Numerous Mongabay reports were also republished in their entirety last month, including one about China’s recent restoration of a ban on rhino and tiger parts, at the International News Lens. Mongabay publishes on a Creative Commons basis and encourages media outlets to republish its features in their own publications [learn how to do this here]. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during November 2018: Asia Times, Asian Correspondent, BioBio Chile, Business Standard, CANIndia, Chiapas Paralelo, City Paper-Bogota, El Ciudadano, El Comercio, The Conversation, Courrier International, Daiji World, Dan’s Papers, Dariya News 5, EJU-TV, Eco-Business, Ecowatch, Earth.com, Earth Island Journal, Environmental Health News, Epoch Times, EurekAlert, First Post, The Hans India, IFL Science, India Blooms, India New England News, Indigenous News, International News Lens, La Mula, Lado B, MENAFN, MPA News, Manorama Online, Millennium Post, Morung Express, My News Desk, NDTV, National Herald, New Kerala Times, Newsheads India, O Eco, Ojo Publico, Orissa Post, Outlook India, Pacific Standard, Phys Org, La Prensa Grafica, Publimetro, Quartz, The Quint, The Revelator, SIFY.com, Science Advances, Scroll, La Semana, The Statesman, Truthout, El Universal, Veja, The Wire, Yahoo News, and Yeşil Gazete. Banner image: Tiger in Cambodia by Rhett A....

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Insiders get the story behind Mongabay stories
Dec05

Insiders get the story behind Mongabay stories

What does it take to get a great story? Sometimes quite a lot, and our team is eager to tell you theirs via the new Insider Content program. Our team has amassed a long list of snake bites, attacks by parasites, flights from bandits and more in the course of bringing stories to Mongabay.com. “Reporting from the field sometimes generates stories in its own right,” explains Mongabay’s Founder and CEO Rhett A. Butler. “Insider Content will tell the story behind the story: what it takes to get great reporting from nature’s frontline. You’ll learn about Mongabay’s origin story, scary close calls our team has had in the field, and what drives Mongabay reporters to do what they do.” For a small monthly fee, members of the new Insider program get a first-hand, behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to produce these stories. Every few weeks, we’ll publish a new members-only article that goes behind the reporting: the trials and tribulations of field reporting, personal travel accounts, photo essays, and more. The origin story of Mongabay is also available to members, ranging from Rhett’s recounting of childhood of rainforest adventures that sparked his nature appreciation, to his fascination with tropical frogs that followed. The program also offers a new way for readers to directly support Mongabay’s non-profit conservation news reporting: increasingly readers are supporting independent publishers that they rely on to ensure their sustainability: the Guardian announced last month that they now have over one million global supporters who fund their content, which, like Mongabay is freely available to all. See the list of benefits and membership levels here. Here are some of the most recent Insider stories that members can enjoy: + The river of blood + A lucky child: Mongabay’s origin story + Face-to-face with what may be the last of the world’s smallest rhino, the Bornean rhinoceros Learn more and start enjoying Insider content at mongabay.com/insider....

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Mongabay publishes peer reviewed paper revealing public interest in environment is rising
Nov20

Mongabay publishes peer reviewed paper revealing public interest in environment is rising

Public interest in conservation, biodiversity and climate change seems to be rising, a new peer-reviewed study published by a team at Mongabay has found. The paper derives from our recent “Conservation Effectiveness” series and looks at the trends in Google searches to divine public interest in environmental topics. Published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment,  the paper has enjoyed wide attention on social media and from scientists and conservationists. The research project was led and coauthored by Zuzana Burivalova, a tropical forest ecologist at Princeton University who was also the lead researcher on Mongabay’s Conservation Effectiveness series, David Wilcove, a professor of ecology at Princeton University, and Rhett Butler, Mongabay’s founder and CEO, Read about the study and its conclusions here. Banner image: The critically endangered golden mantella is one of Madagascar’s most threatened amphibian species. Image by Rhett A....

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Mongabay in the news, October 2018
Nov07

Mongabay in the news, October 2018

Our reporting appears in many places beyond the bounds of the website when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Highlights from this past month include our collaborative investigation with the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists of a Madagascar seafood company “Top Madagascar shrimp co. moved millions among tax-haven shell companies” appearing in top French newspaper Le Monde. This exposé using the Panama Papers spurred a debate in the country about the secret movement of much-needed tax dollars offshore. And New York magazine picked up on Mongabay Wildtech’s story about 3-D printing of reefs, plus Mongabay was featured by Sea Change Radio, a 30-minute interview show heard on 75 radio stations across the U.S., about what’s been learned through the publishing of an ongoing series on agroforestry. Numerous Mongabay reports were also republished in their entirety last month, including one about Indonesia’s government canceling a large development that would have been destructive to marine ecosystems, by the Asia Times. Mongabay publishes on a Creative Commons basis and encourages media outlets to republish its features in their own publications [learn how to do this here]. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during October 2018: AllAfrica.com, Asia Pacific Report, Asia Times, Asian Correspondent, Business Green, Business Standard, CanIndia, Civil Eats, Climatechangenews.com, El Comercio, Cultural Survival Quarterly, Daiji World, DevDiscourse, Earth.com, Eco-Business, Efecto Cocuyo, The Epoch Times, El Espectador, Foreign Policy, Gulf News Today, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, IOL News, Indigenous News, Lado B, Latestly, The Logical Indian, Minda News, Le Monde, Morung Express, La Mula, The New Arab, New Kerala News, New York Magazine, The News Lens, The News Minute, NewsD, Newsgram, Newsheads, North Coast Journal, Online Khabar, Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, Outlook India, Quartz, Pacific Standard, Pacifico TV, Pulitzer Center, SIFY.com, Sea Change Radio, Scroll, La Semana, Sentinel Assam, Sierra Magazine, Telesur TV News, Triple Pundit, Truthout, Urgente24, Venezuela al Dia, and The Wire. Banner image: Ginkgo leaf by Erik...

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Mongabay in the news, September 2018
Oct17

Mongabay in the news, September 2018

Mongabay’s reporting appears in many places beyond the bounds of the website when other outlets republish, quote from, or re-report our findings. Highlights from this past month include our story “Slave labor found at Starbucks-certified Brazil coffee plantation,” which was published in concert with Reporter-Brasil, getting picked up by Reddit (“The front page of the internet”), leading to a massive spike in traffic to our site. Fast Company picked up Mongabay Wildtech’s story about 3-D printing of reefs and Mongabay founder Rhett Butler was interviewed by Norwegian newspaper Dagbladet. And one of Mongabay’s editors published an op-ed at the Washington Post about what’s been learned through publishing an ongoing series on agroforestry. Plenty of our reports were also republished in their entirety, including one about a new audio technique to detect poaching, which was featured by the award-winning magazine Pacific Standard. Mongabay publishes on a Creative Commons basis and encourages media outlets to republish its features in their own publications. Learn how to do this here. Here’s a selection of outlets our reporting appeared in during September 2018: All Africa.com, Asia Sentinel, Asia Times, Asian Correspondent, Bahamas Tribune, Bloomberg, Business Insider, Business Standard, CAN India, CityToday, El Colombiano, El Comercio, Dagbladet, Daiji World, El Deber, Devdiscourse, EFE Brasil, EJU, Eco-Business, The Ecologist, Ecowatch, Economic Times, El Espectador, Fast Company, Finanzas, Gulf Today, The Hoopoe, Inhabitat, Inquisitr, International News Lens, Lado B, Millennium Post, Mizzima News, La Mula, MSN Finance, MoneyLife, New Kerala, News Minute, Newsheads, Outlook India, Pacific Standard, El Popular, Post Online, Publimetro, Radio Santa Fe, Reader Supported News, Reddit, RPP Noticias, SIFY News, Science Magazine, Scroll, La Semana, Speak up for Blue podcast, Sunday Guardian, Technews, Telecinco, TimesNowNews, Tribune India, Truthout, Unearthed, United Nations newswire, Unwire, Washington Post, Weekend Leader, La Vanguardia, Yahoo Finance Espanol and Yahoo News-Brazil. Banner photo: Tree frog in tropical forest of Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo. Image by Rhett Butler for...

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