Mongabay’s David Martin to judge the Jackson Wild film awards
Sep10

Mongabay’s David Martin to judge the Jackson Wild film awards

Mongabay is pleased to announce that its Director of Partnerships, David Martin, is a member of the final jury for the 2019 Jackson Wild Media Awards. This festival which bestows awards on the best nature and science-inspired filmmaking happens this year between September 21 and 27 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. David played a key role in the launch of Mongabay’s diverse video content which is posted to social media channels and aims to raise awareness about unfolding events around the planet, while inspiring audiences to love nature and get involved with conservation. He deeply believes that media plays a powerful role in shaping the world as we know it, and works to elevate solutions-oriented content that moves the needle in terms of creating a livable and equitable planet for all. Of today’s overall environmental media landscape, he said, “It’s really inspiring to see what’s being done to capture the minds and hearts of people and get them focused on wildlife and our planet. We are at a critical juncture.” As a judge, he must watch each of the finalist films in each category, an impressive list totaling some 45 hours of viewing. The finalists in 30 categories were whittled down from over 1,000 entries and range from   BBC’s “Blue Planet II: One Ocean” in the Animal Behavior-Long Form category to “Sea of Shadows” about the world’s most endangered porpoise, the vaquita, in the Best Conservation Film-Long Form category, to National Geographic’s “Last Wild Places: Gorongosa” film about Mozambique’s famous Gorongosa National Park in the Best People & Nature Film-Short Form category. “I’m doing my best to apply a ‘critical eye’ when I watch these films, but honestly at this end point in the process, every one of these films deserves high praise and accolades,” he said. “There’s an incredible amount of quality here.” Read more about Jackson Wild (which has a conservation focus of “Living Oceans” this year) and Media Awards here, and learn about David’s fellow members of the jury here. If you plan to attend this event, please seek David out and say hello.  ...

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Mongabay in the news, July 2019
Aug30

Mongabay in the news, July 2019

Our reporting appears often beyond the bounds of the main Mongabay website and its multiple language subdomains when other outlets republish or otherwise use our articles. In the past month many outlets relied on our work including The Guardian which referenced our report about miners invading indigenous peoples’ lands as part of what now seems a prescient article about deforestation in the Amazon accelerating toward the tipping point that everyone’s been discussing in August 2019 following all the fires in Brazil. Quartz republished our India bureau‘s report about how that country’s quest for uranium deposits to meet its nuclear power goals has now reached a tiger reserve in Telangana. That news was then picked up by picked up by Yahoo and The Independent. Mongabay reports are regularly re-reported or republished like this under our Creative Commons license, and we encourage other media outlets to use our features in their own publications (review our republishing policy and guidelines here). Here’s a selection of outlets where our reporting was republished, cited, or re-reported during July 2019: Africa.com, Agence Ecofin, Asian Correspondent, CNBC,Christian Science Monitor, El Comercio, El Desconcierto, Down to Earth, Earth.com, Earther/Gizmodo, EcoBusiness, Ecowatch, El Espectador, Estadao, Eurasia Review, Fast Company, FirstPost, Forbes, Gizmodo, Gizmodo-Brazil, Globo, The Guardian, Huffington Post, IFL Science, The Independent, India Times, International News Lens, Kuensel Online, Lado B, Leader News, Mother Nature Network, Nepali Times, The New Arab, The News Minute, Newsweek, Newsweek-Mexico, Ojo Publico, La Opinion, Pachamama Radio 860 am, Pacific Standard, Pulitzer Center, Quartz, Quartz-India, La Republica, The Revelator, The Saturday Paper, Scroll, La Semana, Solomon Times, Der Spiegel, Tempo, Truthout, El Universal, Vanguardia, The Weather Channel, The Wire, Yahoo Finance, and Yale Environment 360. Banner image of a leafhopper in Suriname by Rhett A. Butler for...

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Mongabay joins ambitious climate reporting collaborative
Aug28

Mongabay joins ambitious climate reporting collaborative

Famed television journalist Bill Moyers and Mongabay editor Glenn Scherer recently penned an article in The Nation calling for better climate coverage by the media, which was then republished widely. The result was the launch of Covering Climate Now, a project aimed at breaking the “climate silence” that has been common in much of the mainstream news. Co-founded by The Nation and the Columbia Journalism Review in partnership with The Guardian, Covering Climate Now will kickstart a conversation among journalists about how news outlets of all kinds can better report on this critical issue. As one of the many media outlets involved, Mongabay will be publishing one climate change story a day from September 16 until September 23, the first day of the Climate Action Summit hosted by UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres in New York City. At that meeting, the world’s governments will submit plans to meet the Paris Agreement’s pledge to keep global temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius. Mongabay was among the first media outlets to add its name to this virtual media event, which is now 170 publications strong, making it one of the most ambitious media campaigns in history. Mongabay will also have reporters at the subsequent UN event, so our climate coverage will continue during that week. A special Mongabay podcast airing on September 3 will preview the UN event with one of America’s most prominent climate activists, Reverend Lennox Yearwood, President and CEO of the Hip Hop Caucus, so please watch for that or subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast via your podcast provider of choice. Banner image: Waxy monkey leaf frog (Phyllomedusa sauvagii), photo by Rhett Butler for...

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110,000+ signatures: Petition inspired by Mongabay story on a pristine but threatened PNG island keeps growing
Aug20

110,000+ signatures: Petition inspired by Mongabay story on a pristine but threatened PNG island keeps growing

A petition inspired by a Mongabay story has topped its goal of 110,000 signatures, and keeps growing. “Logging, mining companies lock eyes on a biodiverse island like no other” was published on July 31st by Mongabay and the online petition appeared about 10 days later after the story garnered much attention on social media platforms. In the story, writer Gianluca Cerullo explains that Woodlark Island sits far off the coast of Papua New Guinea and is swathed in old growth forests home to animals found nowhere else on the planet. However, the island and its inhabitants face an uncertain future: lured by high-value timber, a logging company is planning to clear 40% of Woodlark’s forests, and researchers say this could drive many species to extinction. The author reports that the company proposes to then plant large tree plantations, and he writes that a gold mine is being proposed for the island as well. The petition is aimed at the Papua New Guinea Forestry Authority and can be viewed here. Banner image via...

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Indonesia for Sale series honored with Society for Environmental Journalists award
Aug14

Indonesia for Sale series honored with Society for Environmental Journalists award

The Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) has given the second feature in the Indonesia for Sale series, “Ghosts in the Machine,” recognition under the Kevin Carmody Award for Outstanding In-depth Reporting as part of its annual awards for environmental journalism. Produced in partnership with The Gecko Project, the series has 3 main features so far plus a number of other assets including video and interviews. The SEJ judges wrote this about the story: “A remarkable example of brave, tenacious journalism, methodically unravelling systemic corruption in Indonesia extending to the highest levels of the judiciary. Few consumers in North America can fully appreciate the human and environmental toll exacted by the palm oil industry. In that sense, this story should make us all think more critically about the true cost of our actions, at home and around the world.” Read the winning story here, and here is a quick video description of it:   Find part 1 of Indonesia for Sale, about a politician who turned his district into a sea of oil palm for personal benefit here, and part 3, which dived into the secret dealings that stand to destroy another massive tract of rainforest, here. Banner image of an orangutan in Indonesian rainforest by Rhett A. Butler for...

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